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Essential Stage Presentation and Microphone Technique for Singers

https://youtu.be/ranJoY8dO-w

In this blog, we’re going to be covering basic essential stage presentation and microphone technique for singers.

The first point when you are about to walk up on stage to sing is please make sure that your entrance way up onto the stage or wherever it may be is clear and you know the way to go with out obstacles. So that we’re not tripping over the stairs, leads, people or things that are in your way. So please make sure you know the way to the stage and its clear and well illuminated.

Second point, microphone technique cardinal rule! Keep the microphone close to your lips and horizontal. Especially if you are moving around or dancing when singing. In other words eat the microphone.

Pull the microphone away slightly from your lips when you're singing louder so that the volume of your voice coming through your foldback is slightly quieter.

When you are about to start singing your song and you’re up on stage, hold the microphone away from your mouth until you start singing. Meaning do not hold the microphone close to your mouth if you were not singing because there is no need too. You want to hold the microphone Close to your mouth or lips when you're actually singing.

And the number one cardinal rule when you are on stage singing is “never stop moving, dancing or swaying to the beat or the rhythm of the song” – I don’t need you to move around and do crazy movements but you need to continually move and groove to the rhythm or the beat of the song from start to finish. This forces you to keep time and helps you feel the song. Even if it is a slow song or a ballad if you don’t do anything else, you’re still going to look great by just swaying from side to side.

Do what you thinks feel natural up on stage – move around or do other movements that you feel natural that are going to help you express the song. So make sure that you’re moving and grooving and putting some little movements that are extending from your moves and are expressing particular words in a song. Like hand raises, hand lifts, hand on your chests e.g. You can also change the way you are holding the microphone from your left to right hand or coming into a double hand grip that the late Michael Hutchins from in INXS made famous.

Once you have you mastered the above, then move on to stage movement. Moving on stage from left to right when you’re singing and taking up the space on the stage.

Go away, have fun practice that and we’ll see you next week!


Microphone Technique and Choosing The Right Microphone

In this blog, we are going to be discussing how to use a microphone correctly for the live singing situation. Now before you do this, you’re going to need to go and purchase some microphone. If you’re doing research online or if you’re going into your local music store, please make sure that you purchase a directional microphone for the live singing situation.

There are two types of microphones out there; a unidirectional microphone and a directional microphone.

Unidirectional microphones are usually used in a recording studio situation. They pick up all of the sound in the room. So, they’re not conducive to use live up on stage because that will make it an EQ  nightmare for the person doing the sound because it will pick up all the other sounds in the room.

So, you want to make sure that you purchase a directional microphone. Directional microphone meaning – only the sound that goes into the microphone is going to be picked up. There are lots of different brands of microphones out there.

Please test out and sing into a few different microphones at a few different price ranges to see which one you like best and it sounds best for your voice. Please do not just go off the reference of the person that’s selling you the microphone; all microphones out there basically do the same thing. There are a little like cars, there are lots of different brands of cars but they all do the same thing. Now, the difference between a good microphone and a bad microphone is only about a hundred dollars. So, you’re better of spending a little bit of money and getting a good microphone.

Once you have got your microphone home, you would have practice with it as much as you possibly can. The first rule that I wanted to you to know about when using a microphone when you’re practicing at home or wherever it may be is:

  1. Keep the microphone horizontal – the sound needs to go into the microphone so all the sound is being directed into the microphone; if we’re holding it like an ice cream (laterally) or far away from your mouth the sound isn’t going into the microphone and you will not be heard clearly.
  2. When you’re practicing with your microphone at home, please don’t rely on your microphone for a volume source or to make you sound better or different – the soul use of the microphone is for amplification; to make your sound as loud as the music or the band that you are performing with.
  3. You also want to make sure that your microphone is also plugged in with its lead into some sort of speaker, amp  or foldback (foldback – is a speaker that the voice will come out of live up on the stage that will be placed on the floor that will be facing you at the front of the stage) so that you can hear yourself correctly similar to the way you would hear yourself when you're performing up on stage.

Here are a couple of tips when you’re practicing at home:

Make sure that you can always hear yourself properly through the foldback or speaker and make sure that the foldback is facing yourself if it’s on the ground.

1. Hold the microphone horizontal and don’t cap the microphone or hold the microphone Cupping photo@0around the ball or top of the microphone – if you do cup the microphone and you are singing clean, this is going to muffle the sound so this is great for harder singers but NOT for the clean singers.  Keep the lips close to the microphone, this will make you sound the best. If you are singing a loud phrase or note, use some microphone technique by slightly pulling the the microphone away from your mouth so that the sound comes out slightly quieter through your foldback. This is called microphone technique and needs to be practised.

 

2. When you’re practicing at home and when you’re moving around, make sure that the microphone follows your mouth. Do not take the microphone away from your mouth because you'll soon find out that your sound will not be picked up by the microphone if it drifts away from your mouth .

So, that’s it for today!

Go away practice. Make sure that you’re have fun with your microphone and your singing.

Tune in for the next week’s blog guys!

Thank you

Peter Vox


Microphone Technique and Choosing The Right Microphone

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gs66X8qAmao&feature=youtu.be


MASSIVE (Brad Marr) Interview Part 3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFWbpeFq5xI&feature=youtu.be


Creating Volume Variances

In this blog we’re going to be talking about the very important subject of using light and shade within a song.

So let’s go now straight into the scale that you can directly apply into your songs. This is going to be a volume scale, we’re going to be using different volume variances. If you have not got access to the You-tube video what I would like you to do at home is simply sing four of the same notes one after themselves in four different volumes. I highly suggest you do this exercise in the middle or higher part of your vocal register as your projection will work a lot better in this area more so then down lower in your register.

We will be also saying “MA” on the very last note so that the voice will not distort. Please while you’re doing this scale or exercise, support with the diaphragm with the right amount of air, underneath the vocal cords especially on the third and fourth note as they are going to be a lot louder. You shouldn’t be feeling any pain or discomfort whilst doing these scales.

So simply sing the word Art x3 and Mar with a cry on the fourth and last note. Your first note should be sung as quietly as you possibly can, your second note should raise in volume and should be slightly louder than the first note, your third note should raise in volume and be slightly louder than the second note and your last and final note should raise in volume and the slightly louder than the third note using a Mar cry with a lot of diaphragmatic breath support.

Practice this in different keys going up and down your range. As I've already mentioned you will get a lot less volume variances in the lower part of your range and a lot more volume variances as you go up higher in your vocal range.

This is a fantastic scale to teach you different volume variances. Please try to listen to your favorite artists and singers and try to apply those different lights, shades and volume variances into your songs. This is so important that we try to use these different lights and shades songs as it’s going to make your songs sound so much better.

Thank you for joining reading once again.

Enjoy your singing.

By Peter Vox


Transitioning between True voice and Falsetto seamlessly!

After reading last week’s blog, you should have a clear distinct knowledge and feel of where your falsetto is placed within your various vocal registers and what it sounds and feels like. Please do not move to this next exercise if you are unsure about what your falsetto is supposed to sound  and feel like. If you’re feeling confident with your falsetto, let’s move to the next scale which is a very important and distinct element of your voice. These skills are going to teach you how to transcend between true voice and falsetto seamlessly with grace and easy.

It’s not that easy as what it sounds, we DON”T that donkey crackle or Tarzan sound. So the most important part about doing this particular scale is keep it moving consistently and surely through the crack or break.

So try it with 1st to a 5th jump scale on the  “ar” and “wee” sounds. The “ar” is true voice and resonates in your middle register and the “wee” is falsetto that resonated within the head in between the ears. Again, please exit whenever you feel that this is becoming too high for you and your straining. If it gets too hard for you, please exit the scale. Now, if you have got this scale down smoothly going up to true voice and then falsetto, let’s move to the next scale. You now need to reverse that exact same scale and do it on a fifth to first jump starting with “wee” in falsetto firstly and finishing on “ar” in true voice. It is the most important scale coming down because this is when you will generally crack and break.

After doing those two scales you will feel that your voice is limbed up between the true voice and falsetto exercises without any breaks. Now try doing the firsts to the 5th and back to a first  interval jump. With the top fifth note being in falsetto and the starting and finishing notes being back into True Voice. Try to do this scale smoothly and seamlessly without a crack or break. Flowing between the two registers with eases. If this is not happening and you're getting a distinct crackle or break ,lighten the volume off a little bit on the falsetto note and smile on the falsetto note. And also try sliding Quicker between the two registers. This will hopefully blend the two registers together seamlessly. That’s what we want to achieve so that we can apply this directly into the songs. So, if you have been practicing these and it sounding good, please go off and pick some of your favorite songs that go in and out of falsetto  and apply these skills to them.

I hope that this has helped you out and make sure you are practicing all the other blogs as well too. If you have been you should be becoming  a very good singer.

See you next week!


Transitioning between True voice and Falsetto seamlessly!

After reading last week’s blog, you should have a clear distinct knowledge and feel of where your falsetto is placed within your various vocal registers and what it sounds and feels like. Please do not move to this next exercise if you are unsure about what your falsetto is supposed to sound  and feel like. If you’re feeling confident with your falsetto, let’s move to the next scale which is a very important and distinct element of your voice. These skills are going to teach you how to transcend between true voice and falsetto seamlessly with grace and easy.

It’s not that easy as what it sounds, we DON”T that donkey crackle or Tarzan sound. So the most important part about doing this particular scale is keep it moving consistently and surely through the crack or break.

So try it with 1st to a 5th jump scale on the  “ar” and “wee” sounds. The “ar” is true voice and resonates in your middle register and the “wee” is falsetto that resonated within the head in between the ears. Again, please exit whenever you feel that this is becoming too high for you and your straining. If it gets too hard for you, please exit the scale. Now, if you have got this scale down smoothly going up to true voice and then falsetto, let’s move to the next scale. You now need to reverse that exact same scale and do it on a fifth to first jump starting with “wee” in falsetto firstly and finishing on “ar” in true voice. It is the most important scale coming down because this is when you will generally crack and break.

After doing those two scales you will feel that your voice is limbed up between the true voice and falsetto exercises without any breaks. Now try doing the firsts to the 5th and back to a first  interval jump. With the top fifth note being in falsetto and the starting and finishing notes being back into True Voice. Try to do this scale smoothly and seamlessly without a crack or break. Flowing between the two registers with eases. If this is not happening and you're getting a distinct crackle or break ,lighten the volume off a little bit on the falsetto note and smile on the falsetto note. And also try sliding Quicker between the two registers. This will hopefully blend the two registers together seamlessly. That’s what we want to achieve so that we can apply this directly into the songs. So, if you have been practicing these and it sounding good, please go off and pick some of your favorite songs that go in and out of falsetto  and apply these skills to them.

I hope that this has helped you out and make sure you are practicing all the other blogs as well too. If you have been you should be becoming  a very good singer.

See you next week!


MASSIVE (Brad Marr) Interview Part 2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PAlBa0J0FQA&feature=youtu.be


Getting the BEST Out of Your Falsetto!

Today we’re going to be talking about using your falsetto vocal cords. So, let me first explain a little bit about the falsetto vocal cords.

Falsetto is a false vocal register, you can clearly hear the difference between a false voice and a true voice and when we can get this working for you in a song, it sounds absolutely fantastic when you can sing from true voice to falsetto back to true voice simultaneously.

I will tell you a little bit about the vocal registers; I have already covered this in one of the past blogs but I would like to recap this very quickly:

Chest voice is your lowest registers, your chest voice will resonate and vibrate when you’re singing down low your singing register. As you move up, you’ll lose this vibration in the chest and resonance will move up into to the middle register.

Middle register. Where most contemporary singing is done in true voice. You will get most of the sound resonance around the throat area.

Falsetto. A distinctly false and artificial sounding voice.

Head voice. Is the last one, which is a lighter area; weaker version of your true voice. Me stress this one more time head voice is NOT falsetto. But, let’s focus on falsetto because that’s what this blog is all about.

Before you start the ‘wee’ falsetto exercise, let’s activate the falsetto firstly so that we know where the sound is resonating and sitting. So firstly, resonate and feel the sound to the back of the head in between the ears. Do this scale in a falsetto and not in the true voice. When the notes are too high for you, please exit the scale but if you can keep on going higher both males and females, tighten the diaphragm a little bit to give support and try to put the sound in between the ears.

After doing the scales, your voice should be feeling a lot more warmed up in your falsetto area and register. Please keep on practicing the scales during the week because next week’s blog is a very very important blog where we are going to explain how to transcend between true voice and falsetto.

Thanks for joining us once again!




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